The State of Church(ianity) 2016

church_1788593cToday the Barna Group released it’s annual report on the State of the Church.  And while many will rightly focus on the positives (like most Americans still identify themselves as Christians), there is continuing evidence for general stagnation and decline.

A glaring example is how the report shows only 1 in 3 USAmericans  (31%) are now “practicing Christians.”  That might sound still pretty good until you read the fine print:  Barna defines a “practicing Christian” as someone who attends church only once a month and also says faith is “very important.”  I’m not sure many church leaders, pastors or professors of ministry would agree that someone who makes it to church once every four weeks is “practicing” his or her Christianity very fervently.  And it’s difficult to understand how that same person could also conclude faith is “very important.”  It’s contradictory, even oxymoronic.  The real truth?  In many communities, particularly in the Northeast and Northwest, less the 10% now attend church every week.

But I think there’s a deeper insight to this troubling statistic:  the continuing disconnect of the modern church with wider culture, including self-professing Christians.

After all, this study reveals, most people still think church is a “good thing.” Most Americans even shrug and say, “Yeah, I’m a Christian.”  But this post-Christian, post-modern perspective reflects a growing type of Christianity that’s more individualized, eclectic and subjective.  Many of these “Christians” self-identify also as the “nones” (no faith affiliation) and “dones” (formerly churched).  They still go to church on occasion, perhaps even once a month, but they’re no longer engaged in churchianity.

Many USAmericans now choose to attend sporadically because it’s no longer the best thing  personally. As one Millennial recently confided (and this is someone who grew up in church): “Sunday morning church is a waste of my time.  I’ve got better things to do.”  When probed as to why the Sunday morning church experience is lacking, this Millennial offered several reasons:  passivity (“I have to sit there and be quiet; I prefer to be active”), lack of connection and community (“I really don’t know anyone nor feel anyone cares about me”), the lack of ritual (“I like to take Communion and my church only does that once a month, so that’s when I go”) and the sermon (“I want to talk about Faith not be lectured and told what to believe or how I should live my faith”).

Now before we cast stones at this Millennial “Christian,” let’s not miss the bigger point:  This individual is very open to Christianity but not churchianity…and there’s a difference.

Churchianity is “come and soak.”  Christianity is “go and become.”  Churchianity is “going to church” while Christianity is “being the church.”  Churchianity is all about numbers: attendance, offerings, facility and staff size.  Christianity is about making disciples anywhere and everywhere.  Matthew 28:18 is the Great Go-Mission not the Great Come-Inside.

Churchianity is stage-focused and lecture-driven.  Christianity is people focused and experience-driven.  Read the book of Acts.  In this historical account there are clear clues, descriptions and explanations for how to “be” and “do” church.  I know this is difficult to comprehend but Christianity doesn’t need a building, an order of service, a liturgy or a preacher or a worship team.  The most authentic expression of ekklesia (gathering or “church”) is a small home group.  There’s only one instance in Acts where thousands were saved on one day (Acts 2) and they all went home afterwards all over the ancient world.  The modern church has reduced discipleship to 25 minute lecture inside the context of an event.  Any commanded rituals like baptism or the Lord’s Supper are rushed, reduced or resisted.

Churchianity is representative and top-down.  Christianity is democratic and bottom-up.  The last will be first.  The least will be honored.  The small will be big.  Water will be wine. You don’t need to be baptized by an ordained pastor or priest.  Church was never meant to be merely a concert and Tedtalk (as one of my students opined).  I Corinthians 14:26 reveals an interesting insight into what church meetings looked like: What then shall we say, brothers and sisters? When you come together, each of you has a hymn, or a word of instruction, a revelation, a tongue or an interpretation. Everything must be done so that the church may be built up.  In the early church everyone prayed (not a few), everyone contributed (not a few), everyone shared Divine insights (not a few).  The Lord’s Supper was a communal meal.  Churches were ruled by a plurality of elders not a single person. Today’s church looks nothing like the original small, interactive, experiential New Testament church.

The problem is today’s Christian (former, inactive, occasional) is rejecting churchianity.  They are rejecting the form.  They are rejecting the wineskin.  They are rejecting discipleship by lecture.  They are rejecting another “service” where they sit there for an hour and watch others perform.

Ultimately I believe a church (a gathering of believers) should be judged only against the Original DNA, as revealed in Acts 2:42.  Essentially, believers gathered to learn the apostle’s doctrine, to pray, to fellowship and to partake of the Lord’s Supper/Eucharist.  This model was clearly Jesus’ intent.  It’s how he discipled.  It’s what he did when they met together.

We can evaluate every church (and services offered on Sunday) by four simple standards:

  • DOCTRINE:  Does a church meeting include teaching of the apostles’ doctrine?  One Body. One Spirit. One Hope. One Lord. One Faith. One Baptism. One God and Father (Ephesians 4:4-6).
  • PRAYER:  Who prays at a church? The preacher or the people?  Is there opportunity for everyone to pray?  Is prayer a promoted value or just supplemental to open and close?
  • FELLOWSHIP:  Do people genuinely know each other? Does the church create connections, conversation and community in its worship experiences and activities, events and gatherings?
  • COMMUNION: Does our church practice the Lord’s Supper every time it gathers?  By the end of the first century, the early Church set aside every Sunday morning to gather and participate in this commanded ritual.

If the church where you pastor or attend answered NO to any of these questions, it’s time to refocus the PURPOSE of your gatherings.  It’s time we stopped the exodus.

After all, as this Barna report reveals, what we’re doing is no longer working.

And it hasn’t for years.

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About rickchromey

Dr. Rick Chromey is a theologian, philosopher, historian and cultural expert. He has empowered leaders to lead, teachers to teach and parents to parent since 1985.

Posted on September 15, 2016, in American church, Christianity, Church Decline and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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