I Heard (No) Bells On Christmas Day!

WOMAN PRAYS IN PEW AT WISCONSIN SHRINEThe Grinch desperately tried to steal Christmas in 1994, 2005 and 2011, but 2016 might be the year he finally gets the deed done.

After all, Christmas falls on a Sunday this year.  And it’s proving controversial.  Some have already called on pastors not to cancel Sunday services.  The reasons are good, but it may be too late.

For centuries in Christendom, a Christmas Sunday was particularly blessed.  The “Christ Mass” and Sunday (selected because it honored Jesus’ resurrection) were highly honored days within Christian culture.  After all, it was widely believed Jesus was conceived and died on the same day.  And since the ancient Jewish calendar placed Christ’s death as March 25, then nine months after this day (December 25) was the date for the Messiah’s birth.  Consequently, when his birthday and his Resurrection (Sun)day landed together, it was something truly special.

Nobody missed mass on a Christmas Sunday.

But that was then and this is now.

In 2016, the tipping point for the decline in American churchianity will be very evident, I fear.  Although I hope I’m wrong, my guess is Christmas Sunday morning services will prove to be among the lowest attended all year.  Many churches have already shuttered services.  Still other congregations are scaling back or reducing services to accommodate lower attendances.

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The good news?  What still draws USAmericans are Christmas Eve services…where I’m definitely predicting larger than normal crowds.  Most of America’s 223 million Christians traditionally gather to remember the Christ child’s birth on Christmas Eve, but it remains to be seen if they’ll return hours later for a second service.  Many church watchdogs feel it’s unlikely and suspect the sanctuary  will be eerily emptier on Sunday morning, December 25, 2016.

Let’s face facts:  Sunday morning is hardly sacred anymore.  It’s just another day for Americans to play, shop, dine, sleep and work. Regular church attendance has been sliding for years (in some parts of the country its in single digits).  The average churchgoer now attends around two to three times a month, even in the buckle of the Bible belt.  This explains the traditional Easter bounce, when on Resurrection Sunday, Christians collectively gather and, consequently, boost attendances. This year, Christmas will likely produce the opposite effect and collectively be a day USAmericans choose to sabbath at home. Many churches have simply decided not to fight the obvious, but is this caving into culture or an attempt to serve the needs of our context?

Will people, including many regular attenders, stay away on Christmas Sunday?  And why does Christmas Eve still attract like the star in the east?  The reasons are intriguing.

First, because Christmas Eve services are often better designed and produced than normal Sunday services (and people know it). Furthermore, Christmas Eve services don’t separate families, focus upon traditions (carols, hanging of the greens) and are more experiential (candlelight communion, living nativities).  Christmas Eve messages are simpler and shorter.  Offerings are designated for community need. Ironically, the churches who draw the largest crowds for Christmas Eve are those who still go old school.  Here in Boise it’s standing room only at the Cathedral of the Rockies every Christmas Eve when pipe organs, Christmas hymns, candlelightings, handbells, high-back pews and inspiring stained-glass windows make the yuletide bright.

A second reason for this year’s mass Christmas Day exodus is because the holiday has become the day to stay home with family and friends.  Unlike Easter and Thanksgiving, nearly everything is closed on Christmas day, especially in the A.M.  It’s the only calendar day that most restaurants, shops and stores shut down.  Families also have special traditions, customs and rituals for Christmas and many of these treasured traditions happen during the morning hours.  Just like churches used to fight the Super Bowl on Sunday night (and lost), now churches who plan Sunday services for Christmas day will also lose to Christmas morning gift exchanges.  This year, more than ever, even regular attenders will stay home…especially since they’ve already participated in Christmas Eve services.

A third reason also presents a brewing problem:  the average church service requires a boatload of volunteers and they’ll likely be missing.  Churches rely upon multiple volunteers to greet, pass offering buckets, lead (and play) worship songs, run lights and sound, teach Sunday lessons to children and teens, distribute bulletins and countless other necessary tasks.  Since most church families will prefer to stay home or wish to be out of town, including those most likely to volunteer, the stress to find replacements is already proving taxing.  It’s not like the old days when you could hold a church service with a preacher and a piano player.  Today’s event-driven worship services require numerous individuals to produce a service. Furthermore, many volunteers will have already served Christmas Eve (including multiple services in larger congregations), so it’ll be hard to persuade them back for another round in the morning.  Finally, it’ll be downright impossible to find teachers and workers for the nursery and children’s ministry on Christmas Day.  And since most families will likely be the first ones to miss church on Christmas Sunday, even if a teacher is replaced who’s to say there’ll even be students?

Consequently, many church leaders are rethinking a Christmas Day worship service.  And some have already concluded it ain’t worth the time or energy.  It’s like Sunday night church.  Television killed Sunday night church services in the 1970s.  By the late 1980s, most churches finally ditched the dead dinosaur.  Similar ditchings have happened with church camp, revival services, Bible Bowl, pews, organs and pulpits.  All good ideas and useful in their contextual and cultural era, but are now largely out of step (despite detractors who argue otherwise).

With that said, I’m not sure a full shuttering of services is necessary.  Just don’t be surprised if only a scattered few show up on Christmas Sunday (the optimists predict 50% of normal).  In fact, I think an unplugged, even acapella, scaled-back worship experience could be attractive, especially if its late in the morning (11 a.m.) or early afternoon (1 p.m.).  An early morning service will most certainly crash this year.  If possible, the services need to require few volunteers.  Use only the necessary people.  You don’t need a full band, maybe just a couple of guitars or a keyboard.

Another outside the box idea is a return to the midnight Christ-mass (candlelight communion).  Historically, Christians gathered at midnight on Christmas Eve to celebrate the Eucharist. What if your church held a midnight service that also served as your Sunday worship service too?  Many Christians, particularly those from mainline and Catholic traditions, value and seek midnight worship experiences on Christmas eve.  Christmas day is then a time to rest, open gifts, eat and celebrate family.  It’s still not too late to add such a service.

For those who are cancelling services altogether, it might be good to publish service times for other churches in town.  After all, you might have a few faithful saints who still want to attend a Christmas Sunday morning church service.

Of course the wild card in this whole mix is the weather.  If the U.S. is hit by a monster storm (or storms) on Christmas Sunday, that will make it even worse on attendance counts.  But, in general, this Christmas Sunday will reveal the terrible, troubling, continuing tragedy of the decline of American churchianity.  Like it or not, it’s getting easier and easier for western Christians to stay away from church.

The old hymn extols how we “heard the bells on Christmas Day.”  It’s a warm and welcome yuletide sentiment.  Unfortunately, few churches now have steeples or bells.  The times have changed.  Consequently, Christmas Eve services is when the Church should unleash her finest creativity, best resources and greatest talent.  It’s the best window all year to attract the de-churched, former churched and unchurched.

And when Christmas falls on a Sunday, like this year, we might also need to relax, reinvent and reimagine. If its best to cancel, that’s understandable.  If it’s better to meet, then so be it. Perhaps it’s profitable to remember Paul’s words to the Romans: One person considers one day more sacred than another; another considers every day alike. Each of them should be fully convinced in their own mind. Whoever regards one day as special does so to the Lord (Romans 14:5-6).

Ultimately, American Christians will vote with their feet this year…they’ll certainly flock to Christmas Eve services and don’t be surprised if they’re not back in the A.M.

Bells or no bells.

 

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About rickchromey

Dr. Rick Chromey is a theologian, philosopher, historian and cultural expert. He has empowered leaders to lead, teachers to teach and parents to parent since 1985.

Posted on December 12, 2016, in American church, Christmas and Easter, Church Decline and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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