Give Me That Old-Fashioned (Acts) Church!

215134_502721361777_6476_nWhat do you remember about your childhood church?

I remember much.  And I’m beginning to miss it more and more.  I grew up in the church of the 1960s and 1970s.  My church was a small congregation in small-town Montana.  The church has never grown larger than a couple hundred, but her influence has been wide.  She produced dozens of pastors, missionaries, elders, deacons, Sunday School teachers and other leaders.

What do I recall about my childhood home church?

I remember the smell and feel of a hardwood pew (where I literally cut my teeth). I remember the clink of glass communion cups and the taste of homemade unleavened bread and sometimes stale grape juice. I recall the sounds of a dueling organ and piano, the Doxology hymn after the offering and the prayers of nervous elders around the Communion table.

I remember stained glass windows that told stories of the Faith.  I remember hymns that communicated deep doctrinal truths with passion and purpose.  The Church’s One Foundation. In The Garden. Softly and Tenderly. The Old Rugged Cross.  Power in the Blood.  Revive Us Again.  When We All Get To Heaven.  We had no band. No lighting cues. No fog machines. No hi-tech visuals.  No sound system.  Just a guy or gal waving her arm to lead us in a hymn’s tempo, whether 4/4, 3/4 or 6/8.  I remember a time when worshippers sat reverently and sang loudly (in parts). Back then our worship leader used to chide that we couldn’t sing “Standing on the Promises” as long as we sat on the premises. Today we stand to worship (and sometimes are chided if we don’t) while many (especially men) don’t sing at all.

I remember congregational readings and prayer times, when we openly shared our troubles, triumphs and trials. In my childhood church everyone had a role. Some ushered. Some gave devotional thoughts. Some served the Communion. Some passed the offering plate. Some prayed. Some read Scripture. Some played the instruments. Some led the songs. Some gave announcements. Some shared a special song, poem or art.  Even the kids were involved.  I once did a “chalk art” drawing on stage while my preacher waxed eloquent about heaven.  I was eight years old.

I remember monthly fellowship dinners where the whole church gathered to feast, but to also share stories, build community and enjoy life.  I remember old ladies with perfect attendance pins (some years in the making), sermons on sin, Hell and judgment, two-week Vacation Bible Schools and revivals, all-night prayer vigils and the annual Christmas play (to a packed house).  I remember hanging with my preacher in his office, his home and even on the job (he was a part-time radio broadcaster).  We played a lot of ping pong and shuffleboard.

I remember, as a preteen how the boys and girls were separated for a few years (Junior Boys and Junior Girls) to learn from same-sex teachers. I remember “sword drills,” Bible baseball and other games to encourage Scripture memory.  I learned how to use a concordance, pray for others, study the Word and share my Faith.  And unlike today I learned without bribery, Bible Bucks or other gimmicks to incentivize my motivations.  To paraphrase a popular hymn:  “My faith was built on nothing less than my preacher’s notes and Standard Press.”

Above all, I recall feeling safe in my church. No matter what life brought me, I knew the saints had my back. My preacher knew my name. My teachers knew my cares. Church was a place to gather, connect and commune. We were family. The parking lot was still full long after church let out.  Few beat it to the door because there were plenty of people looking to talk to you.  Visitors were welcomed and often invited to join for Sunday dinner. We didn’t give visitors a gift.  We gave them our lives.

I’ve seen “church” change a lot in my lifetime, but I miss “church” as it was. Today’s church seems so plastic, processed and produced compared to my church back in the day. Today too many Christians want quick, convenient and entertaining, but at what cost?  Discipleship has been reduced in some churches to a Sunday TedTalk.  In other congregations, especially of the non-denominational evangelical stripe, the only person who prays in the service is the pastor.  The Lord’s Supper or eucharist has become a drive-by, occasional event.  Worship a concert.  Fellowship an accident.  Evangelism something someone else does.

Some might view my reminiscing as criticism, but that’s not true nor my intent.  It’s mostly just observation.  If you’re younger, I understand.  All you’ve ever known is the church of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s.  But the “church” of those decades was in transition and transformation.  It’s wasn’t the “old school” church that those of us 50 and older grew up experiencing.

Personally, I’m not against change.  In fact, I think there’s been many good and healthy changes in the Church since my youth.  I appreciate worship that’s more culturally-sensitive and emotive.  I appreciate that sermons are more applicable.  And I’m grateful for the plethora of resources, helps or ministries for just about every need or problem.

Nevertheless, we have lost some great traditions.  We’ve cut loose some wonderful ways we once connected.  We’ve forgotten some beautiful strategies for sharing, growing and maturing Faith.  I know we can’t go back.  And we shouldn’t.  Today’s church operates within a completely different cultural context and it’s not possible or reasonable.

If there’s one thing we do need is a return to SMALL.  Bigger hasn’t been better for the Church.  The bigger we’ve gotten the more we’ve lost the personal touch.  Unless we can reimagine “mega” into smaller communities (where everybody knows your name), even the large churches will eventually stagnate and decline.  It’s critical the Church recaptures authentic community that provides every person a place, role and purpose.

This was the practice of the early church:  small, home-based communities of probably no more than a couple dozen.  For centuries the Church operated small and contextualized to a particular neighborhood or town.  Discipleship was in upper (living) rooms. Worship was interactive and everyone contributed.  Evangelism happened by riverbanks, side roads and in prison cells.  The disciples were sacrificial in their giving and no one had a need.

It sounds a lot like the church of my childhood.

Can you imagine a church like that today?  I can.

For the DNA of the Church hasn’t changed.  It’s the same yesterday, today and tomorrow:

They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread (Lord’s Supper/Eucharist) and to prayer. Everyone was filled with awe at the many wonders and signs performed by the apostles. All the believers were together and had everything in common. They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts (Acts 2:42-46).

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About rickchromey

Dr. Rick Chromey is a theologian, philosopher, historian and cultural expert. He has empowered leaders to lead, teachers to teach and parents to parent since 1985.

Posted on February 6, 2017, in Christian Growth and Discipleship, Christianity, Church History and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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